My diigo library (weekly)

  • MInecraft music note blocks Skyrim theme

    tags: #diffimooc minecraft

  • tags: #diffimooc

    • A negative? The stories are limited to just 10 characters and 10 exchanges. So you really need to focus on what is “said” in your story.

       

      A positive? The stories are limited to just 10 characters and 10 exchanges. So, because kids are limited in what they can say, it seems like a great tool for summarizing strategies.

  • tags: #diffimooc

    • Well, there’s a new form of professional development sweeping the nation that aims to change all that. Edcamps are unconferences for educators where learners share their experiences and their professional expertise in a collaborative, interactive learning environment. Edcamps are based on Open Space Technology (OST) which states that “whoever comes are the right people and whatever happens are the only things that could have” (Boule, 2011).
    • made up of sessions that are determined on the day of the event: Edcamps do not have scheduled presentations. During the morning of the event, the schedule is created in conjunction with everyone there. I know it sounds crazy, but it works! Sessions end up being spontaneous, interactive, and responsive to participants’ needs.
    • Edcamps were founded when a group of teachers, including me, were inspired by a local Barcamp unconference on computer programming. Since the first Edcamp was held in Philadelphia in May 2010, over 50 Edcamps have been held by teachers in the United States, Chile, and Sweeden. (Interested in holding your own Edcamp? Visit the Edcamp wiki at http://edcamp.wikispaces.com)
    • Lately, Edcamps have received some criticism due to the interactive, unpredictable format. How can you guarantee that every Edcamp session is based on the latest research? Quite simply, you can’t. Edcamps should be used as one meaningful item on the professional development menu. There will always be a place for traditional professional development to ensure that faculties are using the latest research and effectively employing the most fundamental strategies purported by the educational organization. However, using the Edcamp format to honor teachers’ expertise and provide interactive learning opportunities is a worthy process.
  • The kids are using tablets to teach their peers.

    tags: #diffimooc

  • tags: #diffimooc

    • If the design requires me to do an extensive amount of talking, showing, and prompting, then I’m likely minimizing the retention and learning for the participant. In short, if I’m doing the work, then I’m also doing the learning. (Hat tip to a great teacher in Toledo who always says that!) My students should be the ones doing the work; I should be guiding the experience.
        • What I also liked about it was that it was so much fun because you would either be listening, taking pictures, or video taping the people who made the whole session. ~Alan
        • Edcamp was the best thing that we could have done in the whole year. ~Cole

         The next time you plan a lesson or unit, let the students do the heavy lifting. Kids can do anything if we let them!

         

         

         

         

         

  • tags: augmented reality #diffimooc

  • tags: augmented reality #diffimooc

  • tags: augmented reality #diffimooc

    • 1. Google Sky Map

       

      This is an augmented reality app which makes learning about astronomy interesting and fun. Instead of looking at descriptions of constellations in a book and then attempting to identify them in the sky, you can use Google Sky Map to directly identify stars and constellations using the camera on your smartphone.

    • 2. FETCH! Lunch Rush

       

      Recently released by PBS KIDS, FETCH! Lunch Rush is an augmented reality app to teach math skills to elementary students through the use of visualization. Designed in 3-D, the app uses your smartphone camera to place graphics on your camera over real-world surroundings. The app then teaches elementary students to add and subtract using real-world scenarios which allow for visualization while solving math problems.

    • 3. GeoGoggle

       

      GeoGoggle is a great helper when it comes to acquiring geography skills and judging distances to specific destinations. Students can learn geographical measurement such as latitude and longitude by applying GeoGoggle to real-world surroundings.

    • 4. ZooBurst

       

      This is a nifty augmented reality app to help elementary level students learn through visual imaging. With this app, students get to interact and become a part of a story. ZooBurst allows you to engage in digital storytelling by designing storybooks complete with 3-D characters.

    • The digital storybooks can be customized using a library of thousands of images and and users can add Adobe flash animations, narrations, and speech balloons to the story. Once the book is completed, students can become a part of the story via webcam. They can also click on the characters in the story to learn more about them.
    • The digital storybook created by ZooBurst can be rotated enabling you to view it from any angle. ZooBurst can also be used to help students create presentations and communicate complex ideas which would otherwise be difficult to explain. Check out this video presentation to get a better idea of how ZooBurst works.
    • 5. Acrossair

       

      Acrossair is a browser which can be used in real-world surroundings and in the classroom for learning and discussion. The browser can carry apps that push the boundaries of the uses of augmented reality. You can find locations near you and share your locations with friends. Students can also create interactive classroom projects, and participate in interactive photo walls displaying wiki and multimedia on a classroom topic.

    • Another fun feature of acrossair is that it enables you to engage in classroom discussions via Twitter AR. After sending out your tweet, you can launch acrossair to check out the latest tweets by people near you via geotagging technology. Imagine holding up your phone and seeing tweets by the people around you.
  • tags: #diffimooc augmented reality

  • tags: #diffimooc aurasma

  • tags: #diffimooc minecraft

    • Augmented Reality, AR for short, is the term used for adding additional information to the world we perceive around us. Different combinations of hardware and software offer a wide variety of possible experiences.
  • tags: #diffimooc minecraft

  • tags: #diffimooc minecraft

  • tags: #diffimooc minecraft

  • tags: #diffimooc minecraft

  • tags: #diffimooc minecraft

    • This year, I want the activity to be student-managed and student moderated. To clarify, the Middle School/High School Techxperts will run the server for the Grade 2-5 Minecraft activity which will begin in the new year. This will give me the opportunity to interact with the students and just play. It’s a win-win as far as I’m concerned.
    • Multiplayer games like these are tremendous levelers. I am very much a beginner with Minecraft and after a 6 month hiatus, it was all I could do to remember how to fly and move around. The Techxperts were so supportive. When I expressed my need for a refresher course, Pascal suggested I try building myself a spawn point, to (and I quote) “get myself back in the game.” In the world of tech coaching, Pascal modeled perfectly the notion of Positive Presuppositions – assuming the very best of a person, to encourage and support. It blows my mind. I can’t wait for the Grade 2-5s to join in and show the Techxperts how great they are. Because they are. Simply amazing.
    • We refined some of our guidelines based on student feedback, including:
       – If you’ve built something, put a sign with your name on it, so we know who made it.
       – Ask if you’re not sure about how/where to build something – someone will help.
    • A group of students worked on developing a training area, so newbies like me would have a place to learn without accidentally smashing things (yeah, sorry about that Rogan). I look forward to learning the ropes soon!
    • One of the younger students asked if it was ok to copy something that someone had built. The general consensus among players was that it was fine. Then Liam added, “As long as you acknowledge it,” and Mohit said, “You’ve got to modify it a little bit though – remix is ok.” I then gave an example of the hot air balloons (in the first photo). Rogan made the first one (with the colours of the Union Jack on it), and Kenneth made his own one, changing the colours to those of the Irish Flag.
    • I’m not sure if they realised it, but they now have firsthand experience with Creative Commons – they know what it feels like to be a creator and have your work used. Tacit permission has been given to the group to adapt and remix, as long as attribution occurs.
    • This blog post is proving hard to write. I have rewritten this paragraph about 14 times, mostly because I am trying not to sound embittered! I am saddened that the educational potential in games has once again been overlooked.
    • Anyway, at the end of the first session, I wasn’t sure how things were going to work out. I’m convinced Minecraft has spectacular educational value, but this activity is my own qualitative research experiment.
    • As soon as I had logged in, I realised I had completely forgotten ALL commands, including, crucially, how to move and how to talk! By guessing that if I pressed ‘t’ it might let me talk, I managed to chat to the few kids that were logged in and were already excitedly talking away (hopefully unaware of how utterly useless their teacher was at that moment). I asked them how to move – they told me to double-click the space bar, and up I flew.
    • One of the students, Kenneth (G3) wanted to show me his house, so I began to follow him. Unfortunately, night was falling in our little world, so I could no longer see where he was going. I could still chat, so typed, “I can’t see where I’m going! Where are you?”

       

      [Advance notice: I think this is AWESOME!] Kenneth solved the problem by putting down a series of glow blocks, which emitted enough light so I could see where he was going – a modern day Hansel & Gretel breadcrumb trail. Genius!

    • My next obstacle came when I wanted to take some screenshots of a pool built at the top of a mountain. Every time I pressed shift+command+4, I started to sink (as the command for going down is shift). I complained in the chat that I kept sinking when trying to take a screenshot, and once again, Kenneth came to my rescue. He suggested building a block beneath me, so I wouldn’t fall.
    • Day 2 of our server being open showed remarkable progress. Evidence of collaboration was everywhere.
    • Organisation was appearing amidst the chaos.

       

      So what learning have I seen to date? How long have you got?

    • Collaboration & Team work – A culture of collaboration appears to have existed from the beginning. According so some of the players, some people log in and say, “Who needs some help?” and away they go. I have been particularly pleased to see that Grade 7 students have been working alongside Grade 2/3 students on particular projects. This isn’t something I directed them to do (though I am certainly fostering it now), it’s just something that happened.
    • Now we’re starting to get players come up with creative ideas which require a slew of people to assist them. Generally speaking it seems to be a very open culture where suggestions are more often than not accepted and enhanced by the involvement of each new member. A sense of pride in their accomplishments show they understand the value of hard work, and how it feels to have completed something they have put effort into achieving.
    • Creativity & Innovation
    • They have organised their world to make it more efficient and more aesthetically pleasing. It’s quite literally a privilege to watch.
    • Mathematical Understanding – spacial awareness, area, construction, volume… Interaction with Minecraft can only serve to enhance a student’s comprehension of mathematical skills and concepts.
    • Minecraft is a combination of frustration, excitement, and pure adrenaline. It widens your mind and you can get inspired very easily from other people’s creations. You can also learn various tips from more experienced players and most of all you just have fun.
    • a culture of remix and amplification.
    • everyone has something to contribute, something to add, something with which to inspire others.

       

    • Leadership and peer-learning opportunities – Games level the playing field. Tom Chatfield notes that, “A virtual world is a tremendous leveller in terms of wealth, age, appearance, ethnicity and such like…” It means a child can be an expert, a student can be the most knowledgeable source of information. What a powerful concept for a young person  – I have something of value to offer my peers and teachers.
    • This fits in beautifully with  Jean Lave and Etienne Wenger’s Communities of Practice theory of learning, where,

       

      “It is through the process of sharing information and experiences with the group that the members learn from each other, and have an opportunity to develop themselves personally and professionally.”

    • communities of practice as “passion communities” constructed via social networking, where members are usually held to quite rigorous standards in their area of passion. To the novice, feedback is given, support is provided, but standards are not be lowered.
    • I hope every parent of a student playing Minecraft takes the time to sit next to their child and really ask them what they’re doing, why it’s important to them, how/why they create things, and what they’re learning. I’m sure they’d be gobsmacked at the responses.
  • tags: #diffimooc minecraft

  • tags: #diffimooc minecraft

  • tags: #diffimooc minecraft

  • tags: #diffimooc minecraft

  • tags: #diffimooc minecraft

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

About annekurland

#diffimooc participant UAS EDMA 658 Technology for Teaching and Learning Mathematics
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